Fashion Aust Zine

Audrey Hepburn & Givenchy

Audrey Hepburn

 

20th-century British-Dutch actress Audrey Hepburn (born Audrey Kathleen Ruston; 4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was a British actress and humanitarian. Recognised as a film and fashion icon, she was ranked by the American Film Institute as the third-greatest female screen legend in Golden Age Hollywood, and was inducted into the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame.

Born in Ixelles, Brussels, Hepburn spent parts of her childhood in Belgium, England, and the Netherlands. She studied ballet with Sonia Gaskell in Amsterdam beginning in 1945 and with Marie Rambert in London starting in 1948. She began performing as a chorus girl in West End musical theatre productions and then had minor appearances in several films. Hepburn starred in the 1951 Broadway play Gigi after being spotted by French novelist Colette, on whose work the play was based.

Hepburn next starred as New Yorker Holly Golightly, in Blake Edwards‘s Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), a film loosely based on the Truman Capote novella of the same name. Capote disapproved of many changes that were made to sanitise the story for the film adaptation, and would have preferred Marilyn Monroe to have been cast in the role, although he also stated that Hepburn “did a terrific job”.
The character is considered one of the best-known in American cinema, and a defining role for Hepburn.
The dress she wears during the opening credits has been considered an icon of the twentieth century, and perhaps the most famous “little black dress” of all time.[66][67][68][69]Hepburn stated that the role was “the jazziest of my career” yet admitted: “I’m an introvert. Playing the extroverted girl was the hardest thing I ever did.”She was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance.
Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s
The same year, Hepburn also starred in William Wyler’s drama The Children’s Hour (1961), in which she and Shirley MacLaine played teachers whose lives become troubled after two pupils accuse them of being lesbians.
Bosley Crowther of The New York Times was of the opinion that the film “is not too well acted”, with the exception of Hepburn, who “gives the impression of being sensitive and pure” of its “muted theme”. Variety magazine also complimented Hepburn’s “soft sensitivity, marvelous projection and emotional understatement”, adding that Hepburn and MacLaine “beautifully complement each other”.
With Cary Grant in Charade (1963)
Hepburn next appeared opposite Cary Grant in the comic thriller Charade (1963), playing a young widow pursued by several men who chase the fortune stolen by her murdered husband. The 59-year-old Grant, who had previously withdrawn from the starring male lead roles in Roman Holiday and Sabrina, was sensitive about his age difference with 34-year-old Hepburn, and was uncomfortable about the romantic interplay. To satisfy his concerns, the filmmakers agreed to alter the screenplay so that Hepburn’s character was pursuing him
The film turned out to be a positive experience for him; he said, “All I want for Christmas is another picture with Audrey Hepburn.”the role earned Hepburn her third, and final, competitive BAFTA Award, and another Golden Globe nomination. Critic Bosley Crowther was less kind to her performance, stating that, “Hepburn is cheerfully committed to a mood of how-nuts-can-you-be in an obviously comforting assortment of expensive Givenchycostumes.”

Hubert de Givenchy
French fashion designer

Count Hubert James Marcel Taffin de Givenchy was a French fashion designer who founded the house of Givenchy in 1952. He was famous for having designed much of the personal and professional wardrobe of Audrey Hepburn and clothing for Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. He was named to the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame in 1970.His partner was Philippe Venet

Quick Facts: Born, Died …
Early life

Hubert James Taffin de Givenchy was born on 20 February 1927 in Beauvais, into a Protestant family
He was the younger son of Lucien Taffin de Givenchy, Marquis of Givenchy (1888–1930), and his wife, the former Béatrice (“Sissi”) Badin (1888–1976). The Taffin de Givenchy family, which traces its roots to Venice, Italy (the original surname was Taffini), was ennobled in 1713, at which time the head of the family became Marquis of Givenchy.[9]He had an elder brother, Jean-Claude de Givenchy (1925–2009), who inherited the family’s marquessate and eventually became the president of Parfums Givenchy.
After his father’s death from influenza in 1930, he was raised by his mother and maternal grandmother,
Marguerite Dieterle Badin (1853–1940), the widow of Jules Badin (1843–1919), an artist who was the owner and director of the historic Gobelins Manufactory and Beauvais tapestry factories. Artistic professions ran in the extended Badin family. Givenchy’s maternal great-grandfather, Jules Dieterle, was a set designer who also created designs for the Beauvais factory, including a set of 13 designs for the Elysée Palace. One of his great-great-grandfathers also designed sets for the Paris Opera.
He moved to Paris at the age of 17, and he studied at the École des Beaux-Arts.


Career

Givenchy’s first designs were done for Jacques Fath in 1945.[7][12]Later he did designs for Robert Piguet and Lucien Lelong (1946) – working alongside the still-unknown Pierre Balmain and Christian Dior.[7][12]From 1947 to 1951 he worked for the avantgarde designer Elsa Schiaparelli.[7][12]
Hat for Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’sdesigned by Givenchy.
In 1952, he opened his own design house at the Plaine Monceau in Paris. Later, he named his first collection “Bettina Graziani” for Paris’s top model at the time.
His style was marked by innovation, contrary to the more conservative designs by Dior. At 25, he was the youngest designer of the progressive Paris fashion scene. His first collections were characterized by the use of rather cheap fabrics for financial reasons, but they always piqued curiosity through their design.
Audrey Hepburn, later the most prominent proponent of Givenchy’s fashion, and Givenchy first met in 1953 during the shoot of Sabrina. He went on to design the black dress she wore in Breakfast at Tiffany’s.[14][15]He also developed his first perfume collection for her (L’Interdit and Le de Givenchy).
Audrey Hepburn was the face of that fragrance. This was the first time a star was the face of a fragrance’s advertising campaign, and probably the last time that it was done for free, only by friendship.
At that time, Givenchy also met his idol Cristóbal Balenciaga. Givenchy sought inspiration not only from the lofty settings of haute couture but also in such avant-garde environments as Limbo, the store in Manhattan‘s East Village.[18]
Givenchy’s notable clients included Donna Marella Agnelli, Lauren Bacall,[6]Ingrid Bergman, Countess Mona von Bismarck, Countess Cristiana Brandolini d’Adda, Sunny von Bülow, Renata Tebaldi, Maria Callas, Capucine, Marlene Dietrich,[6]Daisy Fellowes, Greta Garbo, Gloria Guinness, Dolores Guinness, Aimee de Heeren, Audrey Hepburn,[14]Jane Holzer, Grace Kelly,[14]Princess Salimah Aga Khan, Rachel Lambert Mellon, Sophia Loren, Jeanne Moreau, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis,[14]Empress Farah Pahlavi, Babe Paley, Lee Radziwill, Comtesse Jacqueline de Ribes, Nona Hendryx, Baroness Pauline de Rothschild, Frederica von Stade, Baroness Gaby Van Zuylen van Nijevelt, Diana Vreeland, Betsey Cushing Roosevelt Whitney, Baroness Sylvia de Waldner, the Duchess of Windsor, and Jayne Wrightsman.
In 1954, Givenchy’s prêt-à-porter collection debuted.[8][17]
Givenchy created the iconic ‘Balloon coat’ and the ‘Baby Doll’ dress in 1958.
In 1969, a men’s line was also created. From 1976 through 1983, the Ford Motor Company offered a Givenchy Edition of its Continental Mark series of luxury automobiles beginning in 1976 with the Continental Mark IVcoupe and ending with the 1983 Continental Mark VI coupe and sedan. In 1988, he organized a retrospective of his work at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California.
The House of Givenchy was split in 1981, with the perfume line going to Veuve Clicquot, and the fashion branch was acquired by LVMH in 1989.As of today, LVMH owns Parfums Givenchy as well.

 




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